The Business Case for Investment in Essential Skills in Numbers

Maintaining Canada’s competitive position on global markets, ‎keeping employment, income and health inequalities from growing and getting more out of our tax expenditures relies on reducing the size ‎of occupational literacy skill shortages. The associated economic rationale for investment in literacy skill upgrading is compelling – investment would yield impressive returns. Firms investing in literacy skill upgrading will be more productive, more profitable and more competitive. Governments should adopt measures to ensure that firms invest more in literacy skill upgrading. Governments investing in literacy skill upgrading would also realize impressive returns on investment flowing from increased tax revenue and reductions in income support and health expenditures.

The Business Case for Investment in Essential Skills in Numbers (c) DataAngel Policy Inc 2015

The Business Case for Investment in Essential Skills in Numbers (c) DataAngel Policy Inc 2015

The underlying policy analysis was undertaken by DataAngel Policy Research.

Related documentation: The Case for Government Investment in Essential Skills
Related documentation: 12 Questions to Highlight the Importance of Government Action on Essential Skills
Related report: Smarten Up – It’s Time to Build Essential Skills

You can download pdfs of all our documents here: DataAngel | Resources

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Average Hourly Wage (2010$) by Essential Skill Level of Occupation 1997-2015

Average Hourly Wage (2010$) by Essential Skill Level of Occupation 1997-2015

This chart links rising wage inequality to shifts in the relative wages earned by the literacy level demanded by the job.

Workers in jobs that demand low levels of literacy have experienced no real wage growth over the past decade.

Workers in jobs that demand high literacy levels have enjoyed very attractive real wage gains.

This difference explains most of the increase in wage and income inequality observed in Canada over the period.

 

Underlying research and analysis was undertaken by DataAngel Policy Research

To download a pdf of this chart, click here: Average Hourly Wage (2010$) by Essential Skill Level of Occupation 1997-2015