A stack of books on the table. Photo by Getty Images.

14 points that matter to literacy | Saskatoon StarPhoenix

A stack of books on the table. Photo by Getty Images.

As work changes and jobs demand higher level skills, people without good reading skills are most at risk of being left behind.

Reading is the learning-to-learn skill. It’s the cornerstone of every other job skill — communication, collaboration, problem-solving and being able to learn and adapt all depend on reading. As work changes and jobs demand higher level skills, people without good reading skills are most at risk of being left behind. People gain and lose reading skill over the course of their lifetimes, but the people entering the workforce over the last few years, are, on average, finishing high school with less skill to begin with.

Read the full article by Janet Lane and T Scott Murray here: Opinion: 14 points that matter to literacy | Saskatoon StarPhoenix

BBC News: The millionaire couple who could teach you a thing or two

“The future is about blending,” she says. “Our online learning courses are traditional, computer-based courses, as you would expect, but we have what we call walk-in clinics. So if someone wants to chat through an issue, they can find a locally-based instructor, pop in, ask questions, get the human interaction.”

Via: BBC News: The millionaire couple who could teach you a thing or two

BBC News: Reaching the parts others cannot teach

It’s easy to take online learning for granted, whether it’s finding how to do something on YouTube or following a free online course from a university.

When educationalists write about Moocs – massive open online courses – it is often about the technical achievement of being able to deliver chunks of higher education courses to millions of online learners. Or else it’s about the economics of universities taking their wares to a wider audience or delivering extra content for their existing students.

But Moocs – a few years after the initial hype about these digital courses – are now teaching people who would otherwise be unable to access lessons.

Via: BBC News: Reaching the parts others cannot teach

Why We Need To Listen To The Real Experts In Science | IFLScience

photo credit: Anyone can claim to be an expert these days. Flickr/Alan Cleaver, CC BY

photo credit: Anyone can claim to be an expert these days. Flickr/Alan Cleaver, CC BY

Disregard for experts who have spent years studying critical issues is a dangerous default position. The ability of our society to make decisions in the public interest is handicapped when evidence and thoughtfully presented arguments are ignored.

Read the full article here: Why We Need To Listen To The Real Experts In Science | IFLScience